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We Are Fluide

"Nowadays, things are much better because I surround myself with supportive people in real life, and online, I follow people that I find inspiring. I think the push for better representation in the beauty industry today has helped a lot."
  • 4 min read
During periods of gender dysphoria, I would reject all things that are seen as traditionally “feminine,” like makeup, because I was afraid people wouldn’t take my non-binary identity seriously. But that also implies a super cis-hetero definition of makeup, that it’s something exclusively used by women to make themselves appear more attractive to men. And that’s not how makeup should be defined.
  • 3 min read
"Being an African American, a Muslim, and gender non-binary on top of that and having to hide so much of myself in my household and even at school, it led me to a push my fashion and designs into something that represented how I felt on the inside."
  • 5 min read
"I realized I wanted to pursue comedy after watching Saturday Night Live for the first time when I was twelve. At the time in my life that I found the show, I was extremely lonely, but after watching it, it made me laugh so hard I didn’t feel as alone."
  • 3 min read
​"I believe wholeheartedly in generational trauma and the ties we have to our ancestors. I see my art, therefore, as not only tied to myself but to all those who came before me; to all of the cultures and forced migrations and exiles that make up my family's stories."
  • 5 min read
"Makeup was a constant throughout my gender journey. Early on it served to make me feel happy and realized while alone in my room. Eventually makeup became a means by which to mask my own features and reassign ones that fit my gender. Now, as I move into a new chapter, I use as little makeup as possible—highlighting features I love, expressing celebration of my black trans face."
  • 2 min read
My work is absolutely autobiographical, so as a queer woman there are many things that you can see there. Some of those things are related to questioning the feminine self and today’s understanding of feminine gestures.
  • 2 min read
"Makeup seemed like the magical key to open up the pandora's box of my (imposed) wildest dreams.I think my relationship with makeup has evolved over the years, even within the past few years, especially in my transition from presenting as a cis-woman to a trans-masc non-binary femme."
  • 4 min read
Jos Hurt was born a Leo in Houston on a Wednesday under a first quarter moon. Raised in a strict household, she expressed herself through her artwork and writing. Before moving to New York, she studied experimental film and performance art. Currently based in Brooklyn, she is a costume designer for film and television, as well as an illustrator.
  • 2 min read
"It is also a way of queering the body and moving as close as I can to being bioluminescent, the shock and vibrancy and bursting of color, its explosive force, its confrontational beauty."
  • 2 min read
"My makeup style was born out of my hatred for our society’s obsession with putting everything and everyone into a box. I wanted to show that unconventional beauty is beauty nonetheless."
  • 2 min read
"Makeup to me is very much to create in a way that I can not with other media. A face is so much more intimate than a canvas."
  • 2 min read

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